Soapbox: Digital assets should be the primary driver of brand consolidation strategy

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Soapbox: Digital assets should be the primary driver of brand consolidation strategy There is no one-size-fits-all consolidation solution but it is clear that careful review of digital assets unlock the best path forward. Dustin Clark on March 26, 2020 at 12:09 pm More When two or more companies consolidate, merge or become acquired, it’s a business decision. But, after that decision is made, how the merger or acquisition is handled from a marketing standpoint should be determined by the digital content of each company, not from non-marketing C-suite executives with opinions based on guesses, not data. The penalties for ignoring digital content – company websites, social accounts, content pieces and technology, among other things – can be disastrous.
When it c..

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Soapbox: Digital assets should be the primary driver of brand consolidation strategy

There is no one-size-fits-all consolidation solution but it is clear that careful review of digital assets unlock the best path forward.

Dustin Clark on March 26, 2020 at 12:09 pm

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When two or more companies consolidate, merge or become acquired, it’s a business decision. But, after that decision is made, how the merger or acquisition is handled from a marketing standpoint should be determined by the digital content of each company, not from non-marketing C-suite executives with opinions based on guesses, not data. The penalties for ignoring digital content – company websites, social accounts, content pieces and technology, among other things – can be disastrous.

When it comes time to develop a brand consolidation strategy, the companies’ websites should be the first digital component to be analyzed. After all, long-term SEO value likely took years to achieve, and it doesn’t always make sense to immediately scrap existing websites in favor of one, single brand website. Sometimes simple redirects can work to retain value from an old website, but not always.

In some industries, a company’s social media accounts may be the most valuable digital asset. If attempting to consolidate into a single brand, know it will take time for value transfer from the old accounts or the old website to the new ones. As such, even if the plan is to shut down accounts, it shouldn’t happen overnight.

By taking a deep dive into companies’ SEO value, social media value, digital content assets and technology integrations, marketing leaders can create a brand consolidation strategy that’s unique to the companies involved. There is no one-size-fits-all merger/consolidation solution. But there is one truth that exists in any scenario: digital assets unlock the best path forward.

Soapbox is a special feature for marketers in our community to share their observations and opinions about our industry. You can submit your own here.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Marketing Land. Staff authors are listed here.

About The Author

Dustin Clark Dustin Clark serves as the Digital Marketing Director at Element Three, an award-winning marketing consultancy in Indianapolis. Dustin leads holistic marketing strategy for clients, working with numerous Fortune 500 companies in industries ranging from technology and SaaS to manufacturing. He brings an extensive background in online marketing, web analytics, digital advertising, and search engine optimization. Before joining Element Three, Dustin was a senior consultant at Relevance, where he specialized in online research and content marketing strategy for a nationwide portfolio of clients. Previously, he managed content and functionality for more than 20 websites as an e-commerce product manager.

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The new contextual ad targeting works, study says

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The new contextual ad targeting works, study says A new study looks at how contextual relevance of ads to content influences consumers. Ginny Marvin on March 26, 2020 at 11:17 am More What’s old is new again. Contextual advertising has come back on marketers’ radar as data privacy regulations (GDPR and CCPA) and browser crackdowns on cookies greatly limit how data and tracking can be used for targeting digital advertising.
A new study aims to demonstrate how far contextual advertising has evolved in the age of machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) as an effective ad targeting method.
Methodology. The study was designed by GumGum, a contextual advertising company that uses computer vision and NLP to analyze the text, images and videos that a..

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The new contextual ad targeting works, study says

A new study looks at how contextual relevance of ads to content influences consumers.

Ginny Marvin on March 26, 2020 at 11:17 am

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What’s old is new again. Contextual advertising has come back on marketers’ radar as data privacy regulations (GDPR and CCPA) and browser crackdowns on cookies greatly limit how data and tracking can be used for targeting digital advertising.

A new study aims to demonstrate how far contextual advertising has evolved in the age of machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) as an effective ad targeting method.

Methodology. The study was designed by GumGum, a contextual advertising company that uses computer vision and NLP to analyze the text, images and videos that appear on a web page (yes, it has skin in this game) and conducted by neuroanalytics company SPARK Neuro.

Researchers used biometric sensors to monitor the participants’ brain activity, gauge their emotions and reactions, evaluate attention, and measure their skin response to stimuli as they were asked to read six articles on different topics. The small test involved 60 participants from the U.S., U.K. and Japan.

Each article had three ads that had relevance to the article ranging from high to low. An article about soccer had ads for soccer apparel, beverages and electronics, for example. The placement of the most relevant ad varied across the articles. The researchers then conducted in-person interviews with the participants.

The study showed users ads of varying contextual relevance alongside six articles and measured their gaze patterns and neuro activity when reading the articles. The placements of the ads varied across the articles. (Click to enlarge.)

The findings. Overall, the contextually relevant ads generated 43% more neural engagement and 2.2 times better ad recall, according to the study. They were also somewhat (10%) more engaging than the article content overall. Finally, the study concluded that the contextually relevant ads inspired a statistically significant increase in purchase intent.

This study did not look at performance metrics such as click-through or conversion rates.

“Yet content isn’t the only context to consider: The media platform, device, time and even location where consumers view an ad can also affect their response to it,” the study notes.

Quoting Horst Stipp of the Advertising Research Foundation in the Journal of Advertising Research, the study concludes: “If marketers understand their specific targets’ affinity to the content with which their consumers engage, as well as the role of other contexts—such as other media platforms, time and place—there are real opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of advertising messages.”

Why we care. Marketers are being forced to re-evaluate their targeting strategies as the third-party data ecosystem is getting up-ended. This study indicates the loss of data for targeting might not be as catastrophic as many fear. It also concludes that it’s not as simple as pairing a cat food brand with an article on cats. (For one, reach will be too limited for mass marketers.) But context beyond the content itself matters, too.

This story first appeared on Search Engine Land. For more on search marketing and SEO, click here.

About The Author

Ginny Marvin Ginny Marvin is Third Door Media’s Editor-in-Chief, running the day to day editorial operations across all publications and overseeing paid media coverage. Ginny Marvin writes about paid digital advertising and analytics news and trends for Search Engine Land, Marketing Land and MarTech Today. With more than 15 years of marketing experience, Ginny has held both in-house and agency management positions. She can be found on Twitter as @ginnymarvin.

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Canceling the MarTech Conference scheduled for next month and sharing our updated plans ahead

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Canceling the MarTech Conference scheduled for next month and sharing our updated plans ahead A dispatch from the “new normal” home office. Scott Brinker on March 26, 2020 at 10:40 am More Hey, I hope you’re doing okay. A crazy and surreal time we’re in.
The photo above is my new “office” in the basement of my house. Yeah, I’ve got a green screen set up. I’d like to claim it’s to support seamless virtual backgrounds in the continuous stream of video meetings that now occupy my day.
But truthfully, it’s mostly just to hide the massive piles of clutter that our basement gravitationally accumulates.
My wife bumped me out of our home office that’s above ground, with a nicer view and fewer heaps of random stuff, to make it her new work-from-home command center. M..

Martech: Management

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Canceling the MarTech Conference scheduled for next month and sharing our updated plans ahead

A dispatch from the "new normal" home office.

Scott Brinker on March 26, 2020 at 10:40 am

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Hey, I hope you’re doing okay. A crazy and surreal time we’re in.

The photo above is my new “office” in the basement of my house. Yeah, I’ve got a green screen set up. I’d like to claim it’s to support seamless virtual backgrounds in the continuous stream of video meetings that now occupy my day.

But truthfully, it’s mostly just to hide the massive piles of clutter that our basement gravitationally accumulates.

My wife bumped me out of our home office that’s above ground, with a nicer view and fewer heaps of random stuff, to make it her new work-from-home command center. My daughter, whose school is closed for at least a couple more weeks, has taken over the rest of the house. It’s not a big house.

So the basement has become my refuge.

I’m not complaining though. I’m thankful that we’ve been able to adapt to working from home with relative ease. So many people are in worse circumstances, with family members who’ve fallen ill, parents struggling with childcare, people with jobs who can’t work remotely — or even work at all, as the businesses they worked at have been forced to close.

This is going to be a hard few weeks, probably a hard few months, for a lot of people.

But I take heart in the many examples of human kindness and heroism shining through, from neighbors helping each other (albeit with social distancing), to businesses doing as much as they can for their employees and customers — and most of all to the front-line health care professionals battling this pandemic.

In the big picture, we’re all in this together. I think we appreciate that more than ever.

MarTech in San Jose Next Month is Canceled (Obviously)

You might say I totally buried the lede on this update with the first nine paragraphs of this post. But, no. An update on a marketing technology conference right now should be kept in perspective.

The MarTech conference that was scheduled for April 15-17 is officially canceled.

No surprise, I’m sure.

I apologize that we weren’t able to announce this sooner. Through last week, several of our service providers in San Jose were still claiming that, since the ban on group gatherings issued by the Santa Clara County Health Department — and then by the governor of California — wasn’t guaranteed to still be in effect on April 15, we contractually had to proceed with them.

“Seriously?” might be the question that pops into your head. It certainly popped into mine. Personally, I didn’t see how you could have had a clearer “act of god” without stone tablets.

But to be fair, these past couple of weeks have been insane for everyone in travel, tourism, and events-related industries. It’s taken time to reach the right decision-makers and work through options. The producers of MarTech, Third Door Media, poured all their energy into reaching reasonable resolutions with those stakeholders as quickly as possible.

So thank you for your patience with us in making the official call.

So What’s Next for MarTech?

We’re setting our sights on MarTech East in Boston, October 6-8.

Everyone who purchased a ticket to the San Jose event can transfer it to Boston or our San Jose event next spring. The Third Door Media team is working with sponsors and exhibitors to get them moved over. And I’ll be working with speakers over the next couple of months to line up the program for Boston.

Man, we had such an incredible line-up of speakers on board for San Jose. I want to thank all of them for being willing to share their experiences with our community. I was so looking forward to their talks next month. But I hope that many will be able to join us in the fall or next spring.

We’re optimistic that life will be getting back to normal by then, and that with pragmatic safety measures in place, people will be ready to engage with their peers again in person.

I’m an introvert — ironic, I know — yet after only a week of social distancing, I’m already craving interaction with people beyond the window of my laptop.

It’s also clear that the marketing profession is going to need to adapt swiftly to a different environment than we had just a month ago. There were plenty of challenges and disruptive innovations headed our way before this pandemic. Now, we’re also going to have to navigate broader issues with the economy and impacts on buyer behavior.

I’ve always believed that managing change and uncertainty is one of the central responsibilities of marketing technology and operations leaders. Admittedly, the kinds of changes I was anticipating were more modest in nature — embracing new channels, integrating new technologies, reengineering processes and workflows, etc.

The past couple of weeks have been a humbling recognition of what real disruption looks like.

But the fundamental mission remains the same: building operational agility into our marketing and customer experience capabilities and infrastructure. It’s a competitive advantage in good times. It’s a necessity for survival in bad ones.

This is still a new field, and one that we must learn from experience — our own experience, but also the experience of others. I am confident that the martech professional community will rally, and together we will do our part to help businesses come through stronger on the other side of this.

I really hope we’ll have the chance to do that in person in Boston this fall.

Discover MarTech Virtual Event April 21-23

In the meantime, we are going to run a virtual event next month to keep the learning flowing. We’ll do a three-hour program, three days in a row, April 21-23, that you can attend for free online.

If you can’t make those exact days and times, we’ll have a recorded version available on-demand afterwards. But if you can join “live,” that might help us share a little more of a connection across the wire. (Weird, but true?)

I’ll kick off the first two days with a two-part keynote, 30 minutes each day, that will cover some of the big martech industry projects we already had in flight as well as perspective on how marketing and martech are like to change in the months ahead, given current events:

  • An update on the martech landscape, year-over-year trends — and what happens now
  • Insights from our Martech Career Study and the four kinds of marketing technologists
  • A walk through of several great marketing stacks submitted to The Stackies Awards
  • Managing change and uncertainty in marketing — in a changing and uncertain world

Each day will then continue with a series of short sessions from our title and presenting sponsors who were originally going to share those solutions with everyone in San Jose. This is a great opportunity to come up to speed on a range of state-of-the-art marketing technologies out there. I guarantee you’ll learn a ton about what’s possible that will surprise and delight you.

Tony Byrne of Real Story Group will start the third day with a presentation on a disciplined approach to evaluating and selecting marketing technologies. And then I’ll wrap up at the end of that third day with a few closing ideas about the road ahead.

Extending The Stackies 2020: Marketing Tech Stack Awards

One more thing. Last Friday was the original deadline for entries to The Stackies, our annual awards program where we invite marketers to send in a 16×9 slide of how they conceptualize their marketing stack. (Details here.)

30 companies — and one government agency — submitted entries, and wow, many of them are superb.

Others, however, got derailed by the escalating situation with the pandemic. A number of marketers reached out to me to ask for an extension under these circumstances. Given what everyone’s dealing with right now, the only reasonable answer is, “Of course, you can send it in later.”

In fact, since we’re not going to be able to host the awards ceremony at MarTech in San Jose now anyway, we’ve decided that we’ll move that ceremony to the Boston event in the fall.

Therefore, we’ve decided to dramatically extend the deadline for entries to September 18, 2020. So if you were thinking about entering, but didn’t have an entry in progress, you now have a second chance.

The entry form is here.

The MarTech Stackies Updated

Out of respect for the 31 entrants who did send in their stacks by the original deadline, however, we’re going to double the number of awards given this year, from five to ten. The first five will go only to entries from this original group. The next five will be awarded to entries from across the entire submission pool.

In the meantime, we’ll be sharing many of the ones we’ve received with readers, along with interviews with several of the people who created those stacks.

Be Well and Keep Your Spirits Up

I’ll close the way I opened: hoping that you’re hanging in and stay well through these next few weeks.

If there’s a broader lesson I’ve learned through my career in marketing and technology, it’s that we are an innovative and resilient band of creative professionals. As we navigate through this immediate crisis and come out on the other side, there will be ample opportunities to apply our energy and talent toward helping our respective customers, communities, and businesses move forward.

Keep your spirits up.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Marketing Land. Staff authors are listed here.

About The Author

Scott Brinker Scott Brinker is the conference chair of the MarTech® Conference, a vendor-agnostic marketing technology conference and trade show series produced by MarTech Today's parent company, Third Door Media. The MarTech event grew out of Brinker's blog, chiefmartec.com, which has chronicled the rise of marketing technology and its changing marketing strategy, management and culture since 2008. In addition to his work on MarTech, Scott serves as the VP platform ecosystem at HubSpot. Previously, he was the co-founder and CTO of ion interactive.

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A Well-Oiled Machine: Why Every B2B Marketing Team Needs Marketing Operations

What makes a B2B marketing campaign great? Is it a creative theme that catches your attention? Is it the insightful expertise featured within? Is it the number of leads it produced? Answer: it’s all of those things and more. Great B2B marketing campaigns have great ideas and great execution. But great execution is hard to achieve. It demands excellent resourcing, swift approvals, streamlined processes, and more. And as you may have noticed, these aren’t marketing functions. They’re operational functions. For your B2B marketing campaigns to truly be successful, you need someone leading the operational side of things. You need marketing operations. What Is Marketing Operations? According to MarketingProfs, marketing operations is “an emerging discipline that increases efficiency and drives consistent results in marketing-focused organizations. It builds a foundation for excellence by reinforcing marketing strategy with metrics, infrastructure, business processes, best practices, budgetin..

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COVID-Consumers: Pessimistic, but spending more online

Retail Get the most important digital marketing news each day. See terms.

COVID-Consumers: Pessimistic, but spending more online A large majority of consumers expect a recession next year but are spending up to 30% more online, according to new survey data. Greg Sterling on March 25, 2020 at 5:53 pm More Consumer sentiment has turned sharply negative as the virus has disrupted every aspect of daily American life. According to a consumer survey from Engine, 88% of consumers in the U.S. are now concerned about the pandemic. And according to another survey of roughly 2,600 U.S. adults from L.E.K. Consulting and Civis (.pdf), between 80% and 90% of adults expect a recession next year.
Buying patterns shifting quickly. In addition to measuring consumer sentiment, the survey explored how the coronavirus has shifted buying patterns across industries. ..

Retail

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COVID-Consumers: Pessimistic, but spending more online

A large majority of consumers expect a recession next year but are spending up to 30% more online, according to new survey data.

Greg Sterling on March 25, 2020 at 5:53 pm

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Consumer sentiment has turned sharply negative as the virus has disrupted every aspect of daily American life. According to a consumer survey from Engine, 88% of consumers in the U.S. are now concerned about the pandemic. And according to another survey of roughly 2,600 U.S. adults from L.E.K. Consulting and Civis (.pdf), between 80% and 90% of adults expect a recession next year.

Buying patterns shifting quickly. In addition to measuring consumer sentiment, the survey explored how the coronavirus has shifted buying patterns across industries. Generally, the survey finds “significant increases in at-home activities, particularly cooking at home, watching television, browsing social media and exercising at home.” Conversely, people are “limiting activities with high exposure risk,” which include going to bars/restaurants, gyms and public events (if those venues aren’t already closed). In addition, the survey found that “online spend is also on the rise, growing 10%-30% across grocery and non-grocery purchases.”

Change in time spent on various activities due to coronavirus as of March 18

Source: LEK Consulting, Civis consumer survey (2020).

Even though consumers are spending considerably more online than before the outbreak, that spending has shifted. According to the Civis survey there are very clear winners and losers. In the former category are at-home entertainment services, at-home fitness, grocery and pet supplies. Losers include dining out (as expected), major household purchases (e.g., furniture) but also restaurant takeout, electronics and clothes.

The data suggest that the money being spent online is a redistribution of aspects of traditional offline spending. Other purchases are being deferred or cancelled entirely.

Changes in monthly consumer spending as of March 18

Source: LEK Consulting, Civis consumer survey (2020)

More online shopping, some experimentation. A separate survey of 1,000 U.S. adults in mid-March, conducted by Valassis echoed many of the findings and trends in the Civis survey. It discovered that 42% of consumers were shopping more online with only 8% saying they were engaged in less e-commerce.

The virus also appears to be motivating many consumers to try on new shopping behaviors such as restaurant and grocery delivery and, in some cases, buy-online-pick-up-in-store. In addition, Valassis found that at least under the circumstances, brand loyalty was being impacted:

  • 48% are remaining loyal to their usual/familiar brands.
  • 21% are purchasing a mix of usual and new brands.
  • 13% are “taking the opportunity to discover new brands.”
  • 19% are feeling less brand loyal, buying what’s available.

These experiences may result in some longer-term changes in consumer shopping patterns. However, about half survey respondents (48%) said they didn’t expect to adopt new behaviors in the aftermath of the outbreak.

Social media usage way up. Finally, as multiple surveys have confirmed, social media usage is up. Valassis found that 39% of respondents have increased social media usage, while 7% have decreased it. The remainder are consistent in their social media behavior.

Facebook itself said that usage was “skyrocketing,” as much as 50% in some hard-hit countries. However, the company also said that the usage increase wasn’t translating into a corresponding increase in ad spending and revenues.

Why we care. While there’s no crystal ball, it’s clear that the virus is a major event for retail and e-commerce, and that some consumer behaviors will change (perhaps significantly) over the long term. E-commerce giants such as Amazon are set to benefit, as will the online channels of many established retailers such as Costco, Target and Walmart. However, many traditional retailers will struggle and perhaps fail in a post-COVID environment.

But more concerning is the consumer expectation of a recession, which may be a sober and realistic assessment of current circumstances. Roughly 70% of U.S. GDP is made up of consumer spending. But expectations can translate into reality with consequences for the entire economy and digital marketing industry.

This story first appeared on Search Engine Land. For more on search marketing and SEO, click here.

https://searchengineland.com/covid-consumers-pessimistic-but-spending-more-online-331519

About The Author

Greg Sterling Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor to Search Engine Land, a member of the programming team for SMX events and the VP, Market Insights at Uberall.

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Social platforms cut streaming quality as ‘social distancing’ wages on

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Social platforms cut streaming quality as ‘social distancing’ wages on Advertisers could soon be feeling the effects of reduced speeds in the U.S., if they haven't already. Taylor Peterson on March 25, 2020 at 5:28 pm More Internet traffic is up, CPMs are down, and media platforms are pivoting to adapt to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. Media giants across the globe are hurriedly making adjustments to keep their platforms stable and functioning during the massive surge in traffic. As a result, major platforms in the EU – Facebook, Netflix, Disney+, among others – are reducing video bitrates or defaulting to lower qualities to make way for the influx.
The push to downgrade streaming quality has been primarily focused in Europe with regulatory mandates to ..

Social Media Marketing

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Social platforms cut streaming quality as ‘social distancing’ wages on

Advertisers could soon be feeling the effects of reduced speeds in the U.S., if they haven't already.

Taylor Peterson on March 25, 2020 at 5:28 pm

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Internet traffic is up, CPMs are down, and media platforms are pivoting to adapt to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. Media giants across the globe are hurriedly making adjustments to keep their platforms stable and functioning during the massive surge in traffic. As a result, major platforms in the EU – Facebook, Netflix, Disney+, among others – are reducing video bitrates or defaulting to lower qualities to make way for the influx.

The push to downgrade streaming quality has been primarily focused in Europe with regulatory mandates to reduce network strain. But the U.S. might not be far behind – and advertisers will likely feel the impact.

Facebook & Instagram. Facebook recently announced it would be temporarily downgrading video streaming quality on its platform and on Instagram for users in the EU. A spokesperson from Facebook told Reuters that the move will help “alleviate any potential network congestion.” Marketing Land has not yet received comment from Facebook, so it’s still unclear as to when (or if) Facebook will follow suit in the U.S.

YouTube. Just a week after YouTube announced it would be reducing streaming quality for its EU users, the company has now confirmed it will cut streaming quality globally for a month. As of this week, YouTube videos around the world will load with the default standard definition (480p) quality. Users can opt to manually select a higher quality setting per video, but upon first loading, videos will no longer default to the high-res standard. It’s an extension of YouTube’s policy in Europe, where regulators have asked major streaming services to reduce their bandwidth usage.

Amazon. The e-commerce giant is also making efforts to downgrade video quality in Europe in an attempt to ease network strain. A spokesperson from Amazon told The Guardian that the company is “working with local authorities and internet service providers where needed to help mitigate any network congestion.”

Why we care

While it’s still uncertain when – or if – there will be broadband restrictions in the U.S., it’s likely that video streaming platforms will still make adjustments to offset traffic loads. Brands in the U.S. currently delivering high-quality, high-budget video campaigns will want to pay close attention to ad performance over the next several weeks.

In the meantime, use the downtime to build a “worst-case scenario” strategy in case your video ad performance starts dropping due to buffering issues. If this happens, prepare to test alternative non-video creatives and potentially pause campaigns in the short-term.

More about marketing in the time of the coronavirus

  • How local businesses should be communicating with customers during COVID-19
  • Amazon FBA challenges highlight broader vulnerability in e-commerce ecosystem
  • Will Facebook's massive usage increases (eventually) turn into revenue?
  • Tell us: How are you pivoting during the COVID-19 crisis?

About The Author

Taylor Peterson Taylor Peterson is Third Door Media’s Deputy Editor, managing industry-leading coverage that informs and inspires marketers. Based in New York, Taylor brings marketing expertise grounded in creative production and agency advertising for global brands. Taylor's editorial focus blends digital marketing and creative strategy with topics like campaign management, emerging formats, and display advertising.

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50+ Top B2B Marketing Insights You Need To Know Today

Even though the “Roaring Twenties” moniker of a century ago today takes on a more menacing new tone in light of today’s COVID-19 pandemic, smart B2B marketers are still hard at work and looking ahead. The B2B marketing world of tomorrow will be shaped by the emerging marketing trends we have seen during the beginning of 2020, and we already have a wealth of insight to learn from new research data that has come out in recent marketing reports. We’ll take a look at: Impressive Results in a Growing Influencer Marketing Industry Social Media Changes & The Rising Importance of Trust The Global Impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) The Role of Emerging Digital Interfaces in B2B Marketing How Voice & Conversational Search are Reworking Traditional Search Engine Optimization (SEO) How One-To-Few Publishing is Poised for B2B Emergence With all these and more, let’s dig in and examine over 50 of the emerging marketing trends and statistics that are likely to play important roles in the B2..

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8 Virtual SEO Conferences for B2B Marketers

It’s the beginning of our second week of social distancing here in Minnesota. I’ve already cleaned my house no fewer than 10 times, cleaned and organized closets, and gone on approximately 100 walks. I’m about 24 hours away from dressing my cats in costumes and putting on a (very sharp, bitey) show. But if that’s what it takes to keep spirits up and minds occupied at home, that’s what we will do. Among the uncertainty and boredom we all face in these unprecedented times, we tend to take solace in the familiar. Keeping ourselves busy with ideas, concepts and work that nourish our minds is one thing we can do to stay sane and focus on the things we can impact. While many of our favorite search conferences are being postponed to later dates, there are still plenty of excellent virtual conferences to attend in the meantime. If you, like me, are looking for something tangible and productive to put your mind to, this list of 8 virtual search engine optimization (SEO) conferences may be just ..

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Marketing During a Pandemnic: Stop Pushing and Start Pulling with SEO

Customer empathy is at the forefront of the best marketing and tone deaf promotions as if things were normal during the COVID-19 pandemic are probably some of the worst. When it comes to understanding the customer state of mind right now, I think Dean Shaw from SAS summed it up well on Twitter: Pro Tip to Companies on what your customers are thinking about right now: – their health – their family’s health – their job – their savings – paying their bills – how to transition to working from home – their toilet paper supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . – your product pitch
— deanshaw (@deanshaw) March 21, 2020 And while we know many of these personal concerns are top of mind, we also know that in many ways, the work continues. So how can marketers meet the information needs of customers in an environment where push advertising and marketing seems so out of place? The customer empathy model I've always used to keep content and context relevant is Discover, Engage, Action. Where are buye..

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Digital Marketing News: B2B Brand Personalization & Revenue Alignment Studies, Coronavirus Ad Spend Impact, & Facebook’s New Horizon VR

Some B2B Brands Are Falling Short On Personalization: Study Some 42 percent of B2B marketers see their marketing efforts as not being fully personalized, despite 77 percent seeing personalized marketing as delivering better customer relationships — two of several insights relevant to digital marketers contained in recently-released study data. MediaPost YouTube to automate more video reviews in light of staffing challenges caused by coronavirus Caronavirus concerns have led YouTube and other social media platforms to turn partially to artificial intelligence (AI) for flagging troublesome content, as temporary in-house human staff shortages have arisen. The temporary measures include possible delays in appeals processes, and increased instances of falsely-flagged content, YouTube and other social networking firms have announced this week. Marketing Land Facebook's Testing a New Option to Cross-Post Facebook Stories to Instagram Digital marketers may eventually be able to enjoy the ..

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